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Social Change Courses @ Northeastern

Northeastern is a leader in experiential teaching, scholarship and activism that advance the solving of real-world problems. The following is a list of Spring 2023 courses that address social change and social justice.

For information about course requirements, please contact the college. Click on “filter” to sort by college or topic. For more about institutes and centers that address public problem solving, click here. To register for one of these courses, please visit the Northeastern Student Hub.

SOCIAL CHANGE COurses @ NORTHEASTERN

The following is a partial list that will be regularly updated. Notice something missing? Let us know at [email protected]

Courses

Courses: Social Change @ Northeastern

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  • Restorative Justice: Transforming the System

    Course Number: CRIM 2370

    Department: Criminal Justice (CRIM)

    Explores the roots of restorative justice and locates contemporary examples of its application in various settings in the United States and the world. Examines its utility in addressing the mass incarceration crisis and the current penal system and mode of punishment in the United States. Students practice and apply critical race and systems theories to use a systems lens to examine the impact of racism, sexism, gender discrimination, and other systems of oppression on behavior and the justice system.

  • Revolution, Civil War and Insurrection

    Course Number: POLS 3430

    Department: Political Science (POLS)

    Explores various types of conflict settlements and their implications for peace and reconciliation. Why do civil wars break out in some places but not others? What does it take to start a revolution? Why do some conflicts last decades, and what can be done to mitigate their costs? Examines why civil conflicts begin, how they are fought, and how they end. Substantive topics include strategies of insurgency and counterinsurgency; the role of ethnicity, religion, and gender; and the relationship between economic factors and conflict. Students leverage fundamental concepts and theories in comparative politics to analyze civil conflicts in a wide range of country contexts.

  • Revolution, Civil War, & Insurrection

    Course Number: INTL 3430

    Department: International Affairs (INTL)

    Explores various types of conflict settlements and their implications for peace and reconciliation. Why do civil wars break out in some places but not others? What does it take to start a revolution? Why do some conflicts last decades, and what can be done to mitigate their costs? Examines why civil conflicts begin, how they are fought, and how they end. Substantive topics include strategies of insurgency and counterinsurgency; the role of ethnicity, religion, and gender; and the relationship between economic factors and conflict. Students leverage fundamental concepts and theories in comparative politics to analyze civil conflicts in a wide range of country contexts.

  • Science Writing

    Course Number: ENGL 2650

    Department: English (ENGL)

    Science Writing: Origins, Ethics, and Emerging Genres

  • Seminar for Design Perspectives

    Course Number: ARTG 1002

    Department: Art – Design (ARTG)

    Explores common design practices, principles, and vocabularies, introducing the design process as a method of inquiry and problem solving through studio projects. Emphasizes the importance of an awareness of audience and context in the creation of meaningful communications and experiences. Explores the practice of design as an iterative process, offering students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the value of systems thinking and the importance of feedback and exchange as a means for assessing the quality of design’s effectiveness in helping users achieve their goals.

  • Sex, Gender and the Law

    Course Number: WMNS/POLS/PHIL 3500

    Department: Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WMNS), Political Science (POLS), Philosophy and Religion (PHIL)

    Examines the legal regulation of gender and sexuality. Investigates concrete legal cases to study the history of constitutional interpretation and the current status of rights for women and sexual minorities. Focuses on important theoretical issues emerging in the writings of diverse feminist and queer legal scholars. Addresses debates over the value of conventional equality approaches in legal doctrine; equality vs. difference perspectives; ways in which legal language constructs gender and sexuality; the incorporation of sexuality and gender in ideologies of law; and the intersections of gender, sexuality, and race in legal doctrine and legal theory. PHIL 3500, POLS 3500, and WMNS 3500 are cross-listed.

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